Third World ‎– One More Time (1985)

Third World are a Jamaican reggae band formed in 1973. Their sound is influenced by soul, funk and disco. Although they have undergone several line-up changes, Stephen “Cat” Coore and Richard Daley have been constant members.

Third World started when keyboard player Michael “Ibo” Cooper and guitarist (and cellist) Stephen “Cat” Coore (son of former Deputy Prime Minister David Coore), who had originally played in The Alley Cats then Inner Circle, subsequently left to form their own band along with Inner Circle singer Milton “Prilly” Hamilton. They recruited bassist Richard Daley, formerly of Ken Boothe’s band and Tomorrow’s Children, and added drummer Carl Barovier and former Inner Circle percussionist Irvin “Carrot” Jarrett before making their live debut in early 1974.

Third World’s greatest success came in the late 1970s and early 1980s, peaking with their cover version of The O’Jays’ “Now That We Found Love” from their third album Journey to Addis, a hit single on both sides of the Atlantic in 1978, reaching the top ten in the UK. Journey to Addis became a top thirty hit album in the UK.

The band’s success continued on through the ’80s, as 1983’s All the Way Strong and 1985’s Sense of Purpose both made the R&B Top 50. The latter album produced several minor crossover hits in the title track, “One on One,” and “One More Time,” which sported state-of-the-art, club-friendly dance beats.

“One More Time’ was remixed by Judy Weinstein and Larry Levan for the US 12” single release.

One More Time (Vocal)                             7:10

One More Time (Dub Version)                   6:24

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Third World ‎– Now That We’ve Found Love (1985)

Third World are a Jamaican reggae band formed in 1973. Their sound is influenced by soul, funk and disco. Although they have undergone several lineup changes, Stephen “Cat” Coore and Richard Daley have been constant members, and singer William “Bunny Rugs” Clarke has been with them since 1976, singing on all but their debut album.

Third World started when keyboard player Michael “Ibo” Cooper and guitarist (and cellist) Stephen “Cat” Coore (son of former Deputy Prime Minister David Coore), who had originally played in The Alley Cats then Inner Circle, subsequently left to form their own band along with Inner Circle singer Milton “Prilly” Hamilton. They recruited bassist Richard Daley, formerly of Ken Boothe’s band and Tomorrow’s Children, and added drummer Carl Barovier and former Inner Circle percussionist Irvin “Carrot” Jarrett before making their live debut in early 1974.

Third World’s greatest success came in the late 1970s and early 1980s, peaking with their cover version of The O’Jays’ “Now That We Found Love” from their third album Journey to Addis, a hit single on both sides of the Atlantic in 1978, reaching the top ten in the UK.

In 1985, “Now That We Found Love” was re-released with new Paul Hardcastle remixes and included the original extended version of the single.

Now That We’ve Found Love (Paul Hardcastle Remix)           5:58

Now That We’ve Found Love (Instrumental)                          6:49

Prisoner In The Street                                                        5:20

Now That We’ve Found Love (Original)                                8:30

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Third World ‎– Sense Of Purpose (1985)

Third World are one of the longest-lived reggae bands of all time, and one of Jamaica’s most consistently popular crossover acts among international audiences. While they were long capable of authentic roots reggae, they usually preferred to mix in elements of R&B, funk, pop, and rock (and, later on, dancehall and rap). Purists often criticized their music as tame and polished, overly beholden to commercial concerns. Indeed, they were regular visitors to the American and British charts during the ’80s, but the best of their output was undeniably satisfying on a creative level as well.

Third World’s self-produced Sense of Purpose LP fused the group’s forward-thinking reggae sound with some of the stylistic changes that were occurring during the mid-’80s.  The band, which was coming off a number 23 R&B hit, “Try Jah Love” (written and produced by Stevie Wonder), incorporated hip-hop/dance influences into the title track single, “Sense of Purpose.” As remixed by Shep Pettibone, the track is built on a “Planet Rock”-type beat, interesting lyrics, and some of Third World’s most shimmering harmonies. It received massive radio play in substantial markets during the spring of 1985. (Allmusic)

Sense Of Purpose (Extended Version)                      5:22

Lagos Jump (Full Length Version)                             5:10

Sense Of Purpose (Extended Club Mix)                     7:00

How Can You                                                              3:55

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Third World – One To One (1985)

Third World are one of the longest-lived reggae bands of all time, and one of Jamaica’s most consistently popular crossover acts among international audiences. While they were long capable of authentic roots reggae, they usually preferred to mix in elements of R&B, funk, pop, and rock (and, later on, dancehall and rap). Purists often criticized their music as tame and polished, overly beholden to commercial concerns. Indeed, they were regular visitors to the American and British charts during the ’80s, but the best of their output was undeniably satisfying on a creative level as well.

Third World’s self-produced “Sense of Purpose” album in 1985 fused the group’s forward-thinking reggae sound with some of the stylistic changes that were occurring during the mid-’80s. The band, which was coming off a number 23 R&B hit, “Try Jah Love” (written and produced by Stevie Wonder), incorporated hip-hop/dance influences into the title track single, “Sense of Purpose.” As remixed by Shep Pettibone, the track is built on a “Planet Rock”-type beat, interesting lyrics, and some of Third World’s most shimmering harmonies. It received massive radio play in substantial markets during the spring of 1985.

The follow up single “One To One” was also remixed by Shep Pettibone and the Extended Versions of both “Sense Of Purpose” and “One To One” can be found on the CD release of “Sense Of Purpose”

One To One (Light Dub)            4:40

One To One (Heavy Dub)         5:10

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